Gates of the Lord: The Tradition of Krishna Painting

Pichvai for Sharad Purnimalate 19th Century. Nathdwara, Rajasthan, India. TAPI Collection, T.03.79. Picture courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. T.03.79. 

The bright colors on the walls mixed with the soft indian music playing in the background set the tone for the artwork in this exhibition. My senses as a painter were overwhelmingly amazed, between the intricately painted patterns, bright bold colors, and the delicate way in which every image was treated. I was reminded of old monasteries where monks exquisitely transcribed and painted books in a reverent fashion. This exhibit is a feast for the eye. Everywhere you turn, precise patterns are painted to perfection as if a machine helped. Imagination also, flows freely within both the miniature paintings and wall hangings. As well, as a sense of devotion in which each artist painted every image. This show, Gates of the Lord: The Tradition of Krishna Painting, is open now through January 3, 2016 at The Art Institute of Chicago. A definite must see for anyone in love with delicately painted patterns and confidently colored paintings. 

Dauji II Performing Aarti on Sharada PurnimaFirst quarter of the 19th century. Nathdwara, Rajasthan, India. Amit Ambalal Collection. Picture courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago.

Krishna Fluting for Gopis (detail), late 18th/ early 19th century. Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. Gift of Marilynn B. Alsdorf. Picture courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago.

Shringara of Summer, mid-19th century. Nathdwara, Rajasthan, India. Amit Ambalal Collection. Picture courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago.

I also pick up a book from the show, check it out. Gates of the Lord: The Tradition of Krishna Paintings